Comprehensive Compliance Solutions

    NATA Compliance Services Blog

    Criminal History Records Check (CHRC)

    Posted by Claudia Culmone on Sat, Oct 08, 2022



    Depending on the type of transportation (e.g. aviation) operation, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires a fingerprint-based Criminal History Records Check (CHRC) on certain individuals, as described by the Code of Federal Regulations, who perform certain security-sensitive job functions. For example, a CHRC must be completed for all flight crew personnel on aircraft that operates commercially and has a maximum certificated takeoff weight (MTOW) of greater than 12,500 pounds. Also, all individuals who have unescorted access to Secure Identification Display Areas (SIDA), and all individuals who perform screening functions for passengers, checked baggage and cargo require a CHRC.

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    Twelve-Five Standard Security Program Training Information

    Posted by Claudia Culmone on Mon, Nov 01, 2021



    Aircraft operators with a TSA Twelve-Five Standard Security Program are required to provide certain training to their security-sensitive employees. Below is an overview of the training modules we offer.

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    Understanding the Twelve-Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP)

    Posted by Brenda Stoltz on Sun, Oct 31, 2021



    With all the regulations out there in the aviation industry, it can be hard to understand the fine print. You know you need to comply with the Twelve-Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP), but you might not understand exactly what it is. So, let’s break it down.

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    Ways to Make Your Aviation Security Training Program More Efficient

    Posted by Brandon Bernard on Wed, Oct 27, 2021



    In the last couple months we have spent some time talking about aviation security training. We have talked about who needs to take training and who is commonly forgotten. This month we focus on more of the economic consequences of training  and what can be done to minimize those.

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    DCA Access Standard Security Program Information

    Posted by Claudia Culmone on Sun, Aug 01, 2021



    On Oct.18, 2005, Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) officially reopened to general aviation traffic. Flights are permitted to/from DCA for Part 91 and Part 135 operators via the DCA Access Standard Security Program (DASSP). DASSP was developed by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to ensure all DCA operators have been properly vetted and adhere to a higher level of security standards. 

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    Maryland Three Program Information

    Posted by Claudia Culmone on Thu, Jul 01, 2021



    The Maryland Three Program (MD-3) allows properly vetted private pilots to fly to, from or between the three general aviation airports closest to the National Capital Region. These airports are collectively known as the "Maryland Three" airports; they include College Park Airport (CGS), Potomac Airfield (VKX) and Hyde Executive Field (W32). These airports are within the Washington, D.C., Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA) and the Washington, D.C., Flight Restricted Zone (FRZ.) 

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    DCA Access Standard Security Program (DASSP) Training

    Posted by Claudia Culmone on Tue, Jun 01, 2021



    An aircraft operator must comply with the measures of the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) Access Standard Security Program (DASSP) to receive authorization to conduct flights into and out of DCA. One of the requirements is to provide certain training to employees involved with the program. Below is an overview of the training modules we offer.

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    Aviation: A Transportation Method for Human Trafficking

    Posted by Joe Dalton on Fri, Apr 30, 2021



    Written by: Claudia Culmone

    Human trafficking is a modern term applied to an age-old system that exploits people of all ages and backgrounds for profit or personal gratification.

    The trafficking of humans can be traced back thousands of years to civilizations that include the Romans, Egyptians, Mayans, Aztecs and Chinese. During these periods, transportation of victims was primarily achieved by marching them over land on foot. In the 17th century, traffickers used ships, transforming the institution into a global business. The dawn of aviation provided a new transportation option for traffickers – one that is still heavily used today.

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    Marijuana and Safety-Sensitive Functions Don’t Mix

    Posted by Whitney Sigafoose on Thu, Sep 26, 2019



    With the rise of legalized marijuana, it’s no surprise that its use is also on the rise. Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse state that marijuana is the “most commonly used illicit drug in the United States." According to a 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 22.2 million people have used marijuana in the past month. With multiple states approving marijuana for recreational use and many more legalizing it for medicinal use, the laws can be very confusing for employees. The below map, posted by DISA Global Solutions, depicts how each state ranges from fully illegal to fully legal.

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    General Aviation Security Guidelines for Airport Operators and Users

    Posted by Joe Dalton on Tue, Jul 02, 2019



    Updated November 29, 2022

    Do you know in 2004 the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) published Security Guidelines for General Aviation Airport Operators and Users? The guidelines provided general aviation (GA) operators a quick resource on topics that had only been communicated to commercial operators. In June 2021, the security guidelines document was updated by the TSA’s Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) to reflect current practices.

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    Client Testimonials

    "I have to say that using NATA is the the best decision I have made in starting and running our 135 Dept. Early on Emily and the entire group never got tired of my endless questions! *Not that they showed anyway;-). We use them for EVERYTHING, starting at PRIA, Drug Program, Records Storage, all the way thru Audit Prep and just answering all my questions. I seriously could not do this without them. Even when my rep Emily is busy, I can rely on Claudia, or Dan for immediate help. The service we receive is well worth what we pay and then some!!"

    Shellie Foster

    - Charter Director

    Clemens Aviation LLC
    I got a gold star from the TSA inspector who inspected our flight school last year, but that's because my company paid me ground time to research AFSP and make a new AFSP student checklist. Even so, I had one (of 3) AFSP applicants rejected initially due to some of the errors you talk about in the blog. I just wanted to shoot you an email and say thanks for making the effort to clarify the process for all of us. I get the impression that there are a lot of the CFIs out there in the small flight schools who haven't got a clue about the AFSP process. So go ahead and feel good about yourself for helping all us lost boys stay in business and out of the trouble.

    Patrick

    - The CFI