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    Why The Known Crewmember® Program Is Becoming An Industry Standard

    Posted by Bailey Wong on Wed, Jan 04, 2017



    In a previous blog post we discussed, 'Everything you need to know about the Known Crewmember® Program'; during this time the program was being launched by NATA Compliance Services from the partnership with Airlines for America. Now that the program itself has been in full swing for over 5 years and several improvements have been made, the Known Crewmember® Program is surprising us all. It has become more than we could have ever imagined and yet it continues to evolve. The KCM Program isn't just a luxury for pilots and flight crews, it's becoming an industry standard and is trending to be a crucial factor in hiring, scheduling and employee retention.

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    Known Crewmember® Checkpoints Now Open to Approved Air Charter Operators

    Posted by Brenda Stoltz on Thu, May 15, 2014



    For Immediate Release

    Alexandria, VA, May 12, 2014 – The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) applauds the extension of the Known Crewmember® Program (KCM) to Part 135 and Part 125 Air Charter pilots with the first nonscheduled airline use of KCM at Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) today. Known Crewmember® (KCM) is a risk-based screening system that enables Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security officers to positively verify the identity and employment status of flight crewmembers.  The program, developed by Airlines for America (A4A) and the Air Line Pilots Association, International (ALPA), expedites flight crewmember access to sterile areas of airports, reduces passenger-screening line congestion, enhances security, and makes airport checkpoint screening more efficient for all who depend on air transportation.

    Although the KCM program expansion was announced in March, today’s KCM operations at IAD represent the first use of KCM by Air Charter pilots. TSA used the past several weeks to train TSA officers to positively identify the new badge that will be used by Air Charter pilots, verify the NATA Compliance Services (NATACS) program management system, and approve the first group of enrollees.
     

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    NATA Announces Known Crewmember® Program Access for Air Charter Community

    Posted by Michael Sundheim on Tue, Mar 04, 2014



    NATA and NATA CS Announce Known Crewmember Program for Part 135 and 125 Pilots

    The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) and NATA Compliance Services are pleased to announce the Known Crewmember® program (KCM) will soon be available to Part 135 and Part 125 air charter pilots. Known Crewmember® is a risk-based screening system that enables Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security officers to positively verify the identity and employment status of flight-crew members.  The program expedites flight-crew member access to sterile areas of airports, reduces passenger-screening line congestion, enhances security, and makes airport checkpoint screening more efficient for all who depend on air transportation.
     
    NATA CS worked in close partnership with Airlines for America (A4A), the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), the TSA and NATA to bring this valuable program to our industry.

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    Client Testimonials

    "I have to say that using NATA is the the best decision I have made in starting and running our 135 Dept. Early on Emily and the entire group never got tired of my endless questions! *Not that they showed anyway;-). We use them for EVERYTHING, starting at PRIA, Drug Program, Records Storage, all the way thru Audit Prep and just answering all my questions. I seriously could not do this without them. Even when my rep Emily is busy, I can rely on Claudia, or Dan for immediate help. The service we receive is well worth what we pay and then some!!"

    Shellie Foster

    - Charter Director

    Clemens Aviation LLC
    I got a gold star from the TSA inspector who inspected our flight school last year, but that's because my company paid me ground time to research AFSP and make a new AFSP student checklist. Even so, I had one (of 3) AFSP applicants rejected initially due to some of the errors you talk about in the blog. I just wanted to shoot you an email and say thanks for making the effort to clarify the process for all of us. I get the impression that there are a lot of the CFIs out there in the small flight schools who haven't got a clue about the AFSP process. So go ahead and feel good about yourself for helping all us lost boys stay in business and out of the trouble.

    Patrick

    - The CFI